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20121113
20121113
STATION
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN2 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
, president of the california business roundtable. hello to both you. ian a you heard mr. hofmeister knows a thing or two about this. we can knock the saudis off and change world politics and changes our balance of trade. will the epa block it, diana? >> well, i don't know but maybe we should listen to what president obama was saying last year. he was brag being the oil and gas development we have in the united states. we got to remind him about that when the new epa regulations come out. so we -- we want to make sure he doesn't bring out those old ozone regulations that he shell of ad couple of years ago because he said they would damage the economy. our economy is growing slower now than it was then. we are really regulating to disaster. >> epa in 2010, diana? $23 billion of regulatory costs for the year 2010. >> that's what epa says. it is really probably a lot more than that. i mean, thee regulations, the mercury, the car ever carbon, ozone, each cost $100 billion each. >> all right. >> they don't have to justify them with benefits because it is maximum achievable control technology. i
. here we go. >>reporter: that is true if the live in the state of california or someone like you would works, why know if you live in new york but you work in new york and the tax rates in new york city could go do 50 percent and california as high as 52 percent, we have not seen rates that high since the 1970's. >>neil: leave aside what will happen on health care people forget this is a lot more than just returning to the clinton top rate of 39.6 percent. it is about going well beyond that and the fact that democrats are feeling their oats after the election and saying, look, this isn't about just marginal rates but the marginal rates and this, not either, or, but "and" this. >>guest: that is what chuck schumer said before the election, saying close loopholes and raise the rates at the same time, which is exactly the opposite of tax reform. >>neil: how does a guy like that who represents the financial capital of the world sort that out and its economic impact. >>guest: this is an important point i am glad you brought it up. what is the financial capital of the world? new york wants to
. it is incomeathome.com. incomeathome.com. out in san rafael, california, which i know very, very well. here's ken. ken, good morning. >> caller: good morning, bill. you know, i think petraeus got what he deserved. this woman is 20 years his junior. he sells the war in afghanistan to the president by undermining the president. and he followed the same processes that never work from algeria to today. it's never worked. never worked in algeria. it didn't work in vietnam or baghdad. it didn't work in kabul. he's promoted as a great general and a great man. this guy's a -- >> bill: ken wait. maybe he should have been fired because -- as you assert, if his policies are wrong then fire him because his policies are wrong. don't fire him because he cheats on his wife or he has an extramarital affair. >> caller: the point i'm making is that he is corrupt as a human being. just like the cowl mination -- the culmination of it. >> bill: i hear you. but i'm talking about on what basis do we decide someone should not be in their job.
that at some point i would like 0 to get back to california. panetta is likely to stay in the post through the budget negotiations and possibly through the spring when they do the next round of budgets. so does that mean he's willing to stay in the pentagon for four more years? for the pool report, panetta told reporters, quote, who the hell knows? my experience in washington is you'd better do this day-to-day. as we reported friday, one of the candidates for panetta's job, when he does go, is actually senator john kerry who is being considered for defense essentially as a consolation prize if he does not get the state department job which is what he truly covets because the assumption right now is, and there's a lot of support for her inside the white house, the president will nominate susan rice to succeed hillary clinton instead. but if rice does get nominated she could have a pretty big confirmation battle on her hands. many republicans, including a guy like south carolina senator lindsey graham who normally ends up confirming a lot of the president's appointments, did in the first ter
have drawn massive protests from california to washington, d.c. for years. and the republican party has made its position very clear and forced the borders and flat out killed the dream act. republicans spelled out their anti-immigration position on their platform. tough talk on immigration appeals to the base. listen to the way romney talked about immigrants during his campaign. >> almost half the jobs created in texas were created for illegal aliens. sanctuary cities. giving tuition breaks to the kids of illegal aliens. four years of college, $100,000 discount if you're an illegal alien. i'm running for office. i can't have illegals. >> imagine what those words sounded like to latinos. now republicans are scrambling to change their tone. all of a sudden, they are saying, we have to evolve on immigration. senators john mccain and lindsey graham want to work on reform. john boehner wants to find common ground. and even sean hannity is trying to shift to the middle. >> we have to get rid of the immigration issue all together. it's simple. you control the border first. you create a pathwa
to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home, in name pa valley -- napa valley, was broken into on monday. so she actually has some literal housekeeping to take care of. they don't know what is missing and sort of this bizarre thing. now, in the event that she does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the sort of subtext, it's almost a shakespearian subtext between hoyer and pelosi. they interned together on capitol hill in the 1960s, and they've been rivals for years, most poignantly in the last 10, 12 years as they competed for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader, and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is maneuvering, is trying to line up somebody who would be her successor of chose. so there's a lot of drama. >> and just rattle off, if you would, who is in that next generation of would-be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement, or even if they don't, would like to move up? >> the -- right now outside of hoye
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
, in daily city, california, south of san francisco. you can see the cars just kind of stuck in the goo there and some folks trying to -- where do you start? i mean where do you start. rick: you can't clean that up. jenna: nobody knows where this all came from. turns out there was a water main break in the hills above them and all the mud came rushing down. jenna: that can be really dangerous. rick: could be. jenna: just the cars stuck at this time. rick: well "happening now" the fda releasing a scathing report on the deadly men inch skwraoeut advertismeningitis outbreak that has killed 19 across the straight. >> reporter: fda inspectors say they found problems with ameridose, another specialty pharmacy in massachusetts that was phonedded by some of the same people that created the new england compounding center. they noted cracked and corroded walls, and even a bird near where sterile products are. gloves are not properly sterilized. the company's products lacked appropriate effectiveness. they said the company failed to document potentially serious side affects where in one case where
and tennessee prescribed nearly twice as many antibiotics as those in california, oregon and washington state. researchers say common infections are becoming increasingly immune to antibiotic treatments. >> be careful with that stuff. >> up next the comedians are salivating over the petraeus scandal. the best of late night is next. have a good night. here you go. you, too. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. on any new volkswagen. some people put everything intotheir name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part fo
. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this being the first day we've convened since the election i want to begin by expressing my appreciation to our chaplain, father conroy, for his very inspiring and thoughtful prayer. mr. speaker, we are here this week to deal with a very important issue, and i will say that we were all taught as kids, better late than never. we're here because u.s. workers at this point don't have access to 140 million potential consumers for their goods and services. and i'm talking about the vote we're going to have on so-called russia permanent normal trade relations. mr. speaker, vladimir putin is not a good guy. vladimir putin has inflicted horrendous human rights policies on the people of russia. we've seen crony capitalism take hold. and that's why it's very important, mr. speaker, that the uni
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)